Military Orphan (Lower) School, Howrah, Calcutta, 1782

অনাথ সৈনিক সন্তান আবাসন, হাওড়া, ১৭৮২
The picture shows the building where the Lower Military Orphanage was maintained by the East India Company for the orphans of regular soldiers. The Military Orphan School, which appears to have been the main institution for orphans in Bengal, was initially in Dakhineswar, later had moved to Howrah. This house, built by a Mr Levett in Howrah on the eastern bank of Hooghly River facing Calcutta, was originally meant for a distillery. In 1782 Captain William Kirkpatrick took over the house as an orphanage for the children of British soldiers of all ranks. Later in 1790 the children of officers were sent to a mansion in Kidderpore near Tolly’s Nullah, and the building pictured here became the Lower Military Orphanage and was maintained by the East India Company for the orphans of regular soldiers.
This is a hand-coloured etching with aquatint by William Baillie (1752/3-1799) – plate five of his ‘Twelve views of Calcutta’ published in 1794.

Chowringhee – A Panoramic View, Calcutta, 1809

চৌরঙ্গী – বিসারিত দৃশ্য, কলকাতা, ১৮০৯
This view was taken from Thomas Graham’s house in Chowringhee with part of Fort William in the background. Viscount Valentia George Annesley wrote of the Esplanade: “in an evening it is covered with the carriages of the richer inhabitants, who drive rapidly along, and with their numerous torch-bearers, form a singular and pleasing scene. The houses are built of brick, covered by a brilliant stucco, there called chunam, which takes a polish nearly equal to scaglioni marble”.
This aquatint was taken from plate 3 of Henry Salt’s ‘Twenty Four Views in St. Helena, the Cape, India, Ceylon, the Red Sea, Abyssinia and Egypt’. As the capital of the British in India, there were more views made of Calcutta than of any other city.