East India Company’s Factory, Cossimbazar, 1795

view_of_the_East_India_Company's_Factory_at_Cossimbazarকাশিমবাজারে ইস্ট ইন্ডিয়া কোম্পানির কারখানা, ১৭৯৫
Cossimbazar was the chief overseas port in Bengal from the 16th to the 18th centuries and as a result, all the different European nations who traded with India had a factory in the town. By the close of the 17th century the English factory, depicted in this drawing, was a highly profitable enterprise. The factory owed much of its wealth to its location, near Murshidabad, and to the efficiency of the Commercial Agent and Chief who ran the factory. Its position as chief overseas port in Bengal was surpassed by Calcutta at the end of the 18th century and the town began to decline.
Watercolour of the rear view of the East India Company’s Factory at Cossimbazar in West Bengal by an anonymous artist working in the Murshidabad style, part of the Hyde Collection, c.1795. Inscribed on back in ink: ‘North view of the Cossimbuzar Factory House.’.

Fort William, Calcutta, 1754

ফোর্ট উইলিয়ম, কলকাতা, ১৭৫৪
This is the original, or the first of the two Fort Williams built in 1696 by the British East India Company. It was constructed under the supervision of John Goldsborough. Sir Charles Eyre started construction near the bank of the River Hooghly with the South-East Bastion and the adjacent walls. It was named after King William III in 1700. The original building had two stories and projecting wings. An internal guard room turned out to be the Black Hole of Calcutta. In 1756, the Nawab of Bengal, Siraj Ud Daulah, attacked the Fort, temporarily conquered the city, and changed its name to Alinagar. This led the British to build a new fort in the Maidan. The Old Fort was repaired and used as a customs house from 1766 onwards.
Coloured engraving of Fort William in Calcutta by Jan Van Ryne (1712-60 published by Robert Sayer in London in 1754.

Bengal Artillery Mess House, Barrackpore, 1850

bengalArtileryMessHouse1850sx

বেঙ্গল আরটিলারি মেস হাউস, ব্যারাকপুর, c১৮৫০

The Bengal Artillery was one of the army units of the British East India Company. It served as a part of the Bengal Army which was the military of the Bengal Presidency. The army of Bengal Province was among the three major Presidency Armies of British India.
After the Sepoy Mutiny in 1857, almost all of the units of the Bengal Army were disbanded because of the involvement of the troops in the revolt. All of the sepoy artillery regiments were dissolved and the European battalions were incorporated as a part of the Royal Artillery. The Bengal Artillery was merged with the Royal Artillery in 1862 as the 16th Brigade, 19th Brigade, 24th Brigade and 25th Brigade.

Job Charnock (c. 1630–1692)

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যোব চা্র্নক, রাজপুরুষ c১৫৩০ – ১৬৯৩

Job Charnock, (c1630–1693), controversial administrator in the British East India Company.

Arriving in India in 1655/56, Charnock was stationed first at Cossimbazar, north of present-day Kolkata, and then at Patna, in Bihar, eventually becoming chief agent of the East India Company at Hugli, on the Hugli (Hooghly) River, in 1686. Threatened there by the Mughal viceroy in Bengal, in 1690 he moved his operations 27 miles (43 km) south to Sutanati, the site of what is now Kolkata. The later selection of Calcutta as the capital of British India was largely the result of his persistence. Frequently at odds with Indian leaders and his superiors, Charnock was at times accused of mismanagement, theft, brutality to Indian prisoners, and having questionable morals; he was once recommended for dismissal. He lived with an Indian widow, whom he had rescued from her husband’s funeral pyre, and fathered several of her children.

Source: Britannica