Fort William Interor View, Gobindapur, Calcutta, c1828

fort William Interiof_1828ফোর্ট উইলিয়াম কেল্লার আভ্যন্তরীণ দৃশ্য, গোবিন্দপুর, কলকাতা, c১৮২৮
This is a view of the interior of Fort William Calcutta looking east across the courtyard towards Chowringhee Gate and Chowringhee Road The new Fort William was constructed as a result of the damaging attack on the original fort by the forces of Siraj-ud-Daulah the Nawab of Bengal in 1757. It was situated to the south of the city in Gobindpore and designed by John Brohier. The structure is polygonal in form and has extensive defences including bastions, earthworks and a moat. The area surrounding the fort, known as the Maidan, was cleared to provide an unrestricted line of fire. This view looks east across the Maiden towards Chowringhee Gate and Chowringhee Road. The Neo-Gothic church of St. Peter, started in 1822 and consecrated in 1828, is on the left.
Watercolour painting by William Wood (1827-1833), c.1828. Courtesy British Library

Russel Street, Chowringhee, Calcutta, 1828

রাসেল স্ট্রিটের দৃশ্য, কলকাতা, ১৮২৮
Russel Street in Chowringhee in Calcutta. Behind Bengal Club on Chowringhee Road, Russel Street runs north-south between Park Street and Middleton Street. The Street was named after Sir Henry Russel, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court from 1806-1813.
Watercolour with pen and ink, dated 1828, by Marianne Jane James, the wife of the third Bishop of Calcutta.

Firpo’s Restaurant, Chowringhee, Calcutta, 1917

ফ্যারপো’স রেস্তরাঁ,চৌরঙ্গি, কলকাতা, ১৮১৭
Firpo’s Restaurant in Calcutta was established after the Great War I around 1917 by Angelo Firpo, an Italian by birth and culture. He opened several famous restaurants, a tea room that was the favorite spot for high society, a renowned pastry shop, and a popular catering service that delighted Lord Irwin, the Viceroy and Governor of India, several maharajas, and very important dignitaries. His refined cuisine made him famous worldwide. The story was that the Governor-General and his court ate lunch there every Sunday. Later, it was only the creme de la creme who found their way there. The cabaret acts were European and the orchestra was a big band – trumpets, saxophones, trombones etc. The dance floor was full size, and the only sprung floor in India, giving dancers an extra lift as they Quick-stepped and Waltzed and Tangoed their way through the night. Firpo’s didn’t have an a la carte menu; it was strictly table d’hote – always a five-course meal, always with perfect options, always scrumptious. Between 1917 and 1960, A. Firpo Ltd in Calcutta employed more than 500 people. It has a turnover of one billion liras at the time and produced bread for the entire Bengal region.
Photograph was taken by Frank B. Sykes, in c1927

Bishop’s House, Chowringhee Road, Calcutta, 1849

কলকাতা বিশপের আবাস, ১৫ নং চৌরঙ্গি রোড, কলকাতা, ১৮৪৯
In October 1825, Bishop Heber, the second Bishop of Calcutta, officially took up residence at 5, Russell Street. The original building was constructed by Major Mark Wood in 1763 on twelve bighas, the first construction on the street. Till the consecration of the new Cathedral named after St. Paul, No. 5 was home to five Bishops. In 1849, The Bishop’s House at 51, Chowringhee Road, with its teak-wooden floors, rambling staircase with its polished banisters, stood till recent time. After 1919, Bishop’s Palace was re-christened as Bishop’s House. A gigantic yet fascinating cast-iron bell hangs from its dragon-bracket in front of the entrance. The bell is covered in beautiful and mysterious numerous characters of the Chinese language etched on its surface and belongs to the Manchu Period, built by Tek Cheong Wu in the city of Hongchu. See more
The photograph was taken by Francis Frith in early 1850s

Panoramic View of Esplanade Area, Calcutta, 1875

graphic1875-PanoramicViewOfCal-fromOchtrMnt

অক্টরলনি মিনার থেকে এসপ্ল্যানেড এলাকার আনুপুঙ্খিক রেখাচিত্র, ১৮৭৫
A wide-angled view of Esplanade area from the top of Ochterlony Monument, Calcutta published in the magazine, The Graphic, in 1875.
A wood engravings by some unidentified European artist.

Panoramic View Of Chowringhee Road Across Maidan, Calcutta, 1868

অক্টারলনি মিনার থেকে ময়দান সংলগ্ন চৌরঙ্গী রোডের বিসারিত দৃশ্য, ১৮৬৮
The view looks south along Chowringhee Road with impressive array of private and public buildings on the far side of Maidan. The Monohurdass Tank in the foreground and General’s Tank beyond can be seen with sight of the spire of St Paul’s Cathedral on the skyline at the extreme right.
This is the section 7 of the ‘seven-part panorama of Calcutta from the Ochterlony Monument’ taken by Samuel Bourne in 1868.

Panoramic View of Chowringhee Road, 1850

চৌরঙ্গী রোডের বিসারিত দৃশ্য, ১৮৫০
Here is another panoramic view of Esplanade area focused on the Chowringhee road – the most elegant part of city. The city was then known as ‘The City of Palaces’ due to the impressive array of public buildings along with Esplanade Row and Chowringhee Road. The view of the Chowringee Road, on the far side of Maidan and Dhurrumtala Tank, was probably taken from the top of the Ochterlony Monument like the two other photographs he took focusing on different points, one on the Government House and the other on High Court.
Photographer: Francis Frith

Panoramic View Of Esplanade Area, Calcutta, 1865

অক্টারলনি মিনার থেকে এসপ্ল্যানেড অঞ্চলের বিসারিত দৃশ্য, ১৮৬৫
Here is a panoramic view of Esplanade area from the top of the Ochterlony Monument focusing on the handsome architecture of the ‘city of palaces‘ as it was called in those days its impressive array of public and private buildings along with Esplanade Row and Chowringhee Road. This photograph is a part of the album ‘Photographs of India & Overland Route’contributed by many other contemporary photographers, including Samuel Bourne.
This was taken by Oscar Jean Baptiste Mallitte in the 1860s

Military Club House across the Dhurrumtollah Tank, Esplanade Row, Calcutta, 1851

clubHouse-Tankধর্মতলা তালাও সংলগ্ন মিলিটারি ক্লাব, এসপ্ল্যানেড রো, কলকাতা, ১৮৫১
This is a view looking across the Dhurrumtollah Tank towards the buildings along Esplanade Row. The Military Club, later United Services Club, and finally the Bengal Club, is the four storied building on the left. When the Bengal Club was first conceived in the winter of 1826-7, it was christened the Calcutta United Service Club, at a meeting held in the Calcutta Town Hall. It was presided over by Lt Col the Hon J. Finch, who was later to become the first President of the Club. The Club was housed in a building in Esplanade West, erected in 1813. Fund raising was through the then popular method of lottery. This large neo-classical building now houses the Geological Survey of India.
A hand-coloured print of the Military Club House, Calcutta, from the Fiebig Collection: Views of Calcutta and Surrounding Districts, taken by Frederick Fiebig in 1851.

Bengal Club House, Esplanade Row, Calcutta, 1833

clubHouseবেঙ্গল ক্লাব, এসপ্ল্যানেড রো, কলকাতা, ১৮৩৩
The Bengal Club was founded at Calcutta in 1827. At the time this image was produced the club was housed in Gordon’s Buildings in the middle of Esplanade Row. It moved to Tank Square around 1830 and subsequently purchased the house in Chowringhee Road formerly occupied by Thomas Babington Macaulay. The Bengal Club is still in existence at this site.
When the Bengal Club was first conceived in the winter of 1826-7, it was christened the Calcutta United Service Club, at a meeting held in the Calcutta Town Hall. It was presided over by Lt Col the Hon J. Finch, who was later to become the first President of the Club. The Club was housed in a building in Esplanade West, erected in 1813. Fund raising was through the then popular method of lottery.
This is a lithograph of William Wood, derives from plate 5 of his album ‘Views of Calcutta’, 1933

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