Royal Calcutta Golf Club. Tollygunge ( since 1910), 1829

F.G. Tait driving and Professor Tait watching. Calcutta Cup, 1898 (1st recorded final).
রয়েল ক্যালকাটা গলফ ক্লাব, টালিগঞ্জ (১৯১০ থেকে)), ১৮২৯
Calcutta Golf Club, established in 1829, is the oldest golf club in India and the first outside Great Britain. Originally located near the Dumdum airport, the Club moved to the Maidan and finally to its present location at Tollygunge in 1910. The area over which the golf course is laid was originally paddy fields, and therefore very flat. Successive committees have built mounds and planted thousands of trees and shrubs. In 1907, the Club acquired 280 bighas of land in Tollygunge on perpetual annual lease of Rs. 15 per bigha. While the amount may seem paltry today, it was then a princely sum. In 1909 a nine-hole course was constructed. The remaining nine holes were constructed over the next two years. By November 1911, the Club owned a total of 308 bighas and the target was now revised so that two 18-hole courses could be constructed. On November 5, 1912, His Imperial Majesty the King Emperor had been graciously pleased to grant the title Royal to the Calcutta Golf Club”. Royal-Calcutta-golf-club3The clubhouse, as we see it today was constructed and completed in 1914. The new course was completed in 1925 and Royal thus had 36 holes to offer. The Club’s most striking feature, however, is its strategically located water tanks. The two large tanks across the seventh fairway, a 457 yards, par four hole. From the tee, the tiger line is over the first tank and must carry all of 230 yards safer route to the right which leaves a very long second shot over the second tank, a good 100 yards wide, to a small undulating green wickedly trapped all around. The out-of-boundary wall dangerously hugs the entire left flank of this hole.Calcutta Ladies Golf Club, 1892 See more
Meant exclusively for the use of gentlemen, ladies were very reluctantly admitted to the club in 1886, when the committee voted 43 against 13 on the condition that female members be allowed to use the course only in the mornings.

This vintage photograph of two veteran British golfers, F G Tait and Professor Tait , watching. Calcutta Cup, 1898 (1st recorded final). Courtesy: Vintage Golf Photographs. http://www.masterworksofgolf.com/historical/all_historical.html

Bengal Club, Calcutta. Chowringhee Road, Calcutta, 1850s

বেঙ্গল ক্লাব, চৌরঙ্গি রোড, কলকাতা, c১৮৫০
The Bengal Club was founded at Calcutta in 1827. When the Club was first conceived, it was christened the Calcutta United Service Club, at a meeting held in the Calcutta Town Hall. The Club was housed in a building in Esplanade West, erected in 1813. It moved to Tank Square around 1830 and subsequently purchased the house in Chowringhee Road formerly occupied by Thomas Babington Macaulay. The Bengal Club is still in existence at this site.
This is a whole-plate albumen print of a photograph taken by Francis Frith between 1850 and 1854.

United Service Club, Calcutta, 1850s

ইউনায়িটেড সার্ভিস ক্লাব, চৌরঙ্গি রোড, কলকাতা, c১৮৫০
General view of the classical building, housing the United Services Club. “Was formerly styled the Bengal Military Club, the members of which were limited to the I.C.S. and military services. As time, however, moved on and things changed they found that this particular form of exclusiveness was rather an expensive luxury, and very wisely threw open wide the heavenly portals and admitted within their celestial and sacred precincts members of other government services, save and except those of the Bengal pilots. Why the club ever made this invidious distinction, of course I cannot say, but at a later period, recognising possibly the injustice of their action, they rescinded their prohibition, and now the pilots sit in the seats of the mighty amongst the members of the other services. The club house, as many people will recollect, originally stood on the site of Chowringhee Mansions. It was quite an ordinary looking dwelling enclosed by a brick-wall skirting Chowringhee Road, and the building extended for some little distance down Kyd Street” – Recollections of Calcutta. Massey. 1918
Photograph taken from Chowringhee Road by Francis Frith in 1850s.

See a comparable photograph taken by W. G. Stretton taken in the 1870s

Military Club House across the Dhurrumtollah Tank, Esplanade Row, Calcutta, 1851

clubHouse-Tankধর্মতলা তালাও সংলগ্ন মিলিটারি ক্লাব, এসপ্ল্যানেড রো, কলকাতা, ১৮৫১
This is a view looking across the Dhurrumtollah Tank towards the buildings along Esplanade Row. The Military Club, later United Services Club, and finally the Bengal Club, is the four storied building on the left. When the Bengal Club was first conceived in the winter of 1826-7, it was christened the Calcutta United Service Club, at a meeting held in the Calcutta Town Hall. It was presided over by Lt Col the Hon J. Finch, who was later to become the first President of the Club. The Club was housed in a building in Esplanade West, erected in 1813. Fund raising was through the then popular method of lottery. This large neo-classical building now houses the Geological Survey of India.
A hand-coloured print of the Military Club House, Calcutta, from the Fiebig Collection: Views of Calcutta and Surrounding Districts, taken by Frederick Fiebig in 1851.

Bengal Club House, Esplanade Row, Calcutta, 1833

clubHouseবেঙ্গল ক্লাব, এসপ্ল্যানেড রো, কলকাতা, ১৮৩৩
The Bengal Club was founded at Calcutta in 1827. At the time this image was produced the club was housed in Gordon’s Buildings in the middle of Esplanade Row. It moved to Tank Square around 1830 and subsequently purchased the house in Chowringhee Road formerly occupied by Thomas Babington Macaulay. The Bengal Club is still in existence at this site.
When the Bengal Club was first conceived in the winter of 1826-7, it was christened the Calcutta United Service Club, at a meeting held in the Calcutta Town Hall. It was presided over by Lt Col the Hon J. Finch, who was later to become the first President of the Club. The Club was housed in a building in Esplanade West, erected in 1813. Fund raising was through the then popular method of lottery.
This is a lithograph of William Wood, derives from plate 5 of his album ‘Views of Calcutta’, 1933