Fort William, Calcutta, 1781

ফোর্ট উইলিয়ম, কলকাতা, ১৭৮১
In 1756, the Nawab of Bengal, Siraj Ud Daulah, destroyed the original Fort William of Calcuttal, temporarily conquered the city, and changed its name to Alinagar. This led the British to build a new fort in the Maidan. The rebuilding of the fort was started by Robert Clive in 1758, after the Battle of Plassey (1757), and completed in 1781 at a cost of approximately two million pounds. The area around the Fort was cleared, and the Maidan became “the Lungs of Kolkata”. It stretches for around 3 km in the north-south direction and is around 1 km wide. It was built by Robert Clive in the year 1781 spread over an area of 70.9 hectares. Today this fort located in the periphery of the lush green Maidan is the property of Indian Army. The headquarters of Eastern Command is based at Fort William and it has provisions for accommodating 10,000 army personnel. The Fort is built of brick and mortar in the shape of an irregular octagon with an area 5 km². Five of its sides face landward, and three towards the Hooghly River. It is surrounded by a dry moat 9 m deep and 15 m broad, which can be flooded but is designed as an area in which to use enfilade (or “flanking”) fire against any attackers reaching the walls.
Aquatint with a view of Calcutta from Fort William, from a set of prints published by Edward Orme in 1807.