Kidderpore Bridge, Calcutta, 1826

KidderporeBridge
খিদিরপুর ব্রিজ, কলকাতা, ১৮২৬
The Kidderpore Bridge,the earliest stone-and-iron suspension bridge in India, lay at the end of the Course – the road that crossed the Maidan. It was the oldest road on the Maidan and was described in 1768 as being made to take the air. But, as an old song goes, ‘those who frequented it swallowed ten mouthfuls of dust for one of fresh air’. The road, however, is still one of the airiest and pleasantest drives in Calcutta, extended from the Cocked Hat, or কুঁকরো হাটা, to the Kidderpore Bridge, on the north, built up to the canal excavated by Colonel Tolly at his own expense, He reimbursed himself for this toil by a bazar or ganj at the place which still bears his name, Tolly ganj, and by tolls on crafts making use of his canal. in 1775.fiebig_frederick-kidderpore_bridge_calcutta_view The canal, formerly known as the Govindpore Creek, was, in fact, part of the old bed of the Ganges. It now runs into the Circular Canal, which again communicates with the Hooghly, forming the great inlet for country boats bringing produce from the Sunderbunds and the eastern districts of Bengal. The Nullah is here joined by a bridge once known by the name of Edward Surman, the head of the Embassy to Delhi in 1717, but now called Kidderpore Bridge. The bridge was built in 1826 and was the earliest stone-and-iron suspension bridge in India.
Kidderpore, Alipore and Bhowanipore were three suburbs of Calcutta, south of the Maidan. They were set apart from it by the canal known as Tolly’s Nullah (a canal), which necessitated the building of such bridges. It is traversed by the Calcutta ways, which run from here direct to the Esplanade on at the corner of Dhurrumtollah.

The view of the Kidderpore Bridge above is from a hand-coloured photograph print belonging to the Frederick Fiebig Collection: Views of Calcutta and Surrounding Districts, published in 1851. The inset photographic view of the ‘Tolly Nullah’ is also by Frederich Fiebig

Panoramic View of Esplanade Area, Calcutta, 1875

graphic1875-PanoramicViewOfCal-fromOchtrMnt

অক্টরলনি মিনার থেকে এসপ্ল্যানেড এলাকার আনুপুঙ্খিক রেখাচিত্র, ১৮৭৫
A wide-angled view of Esplanade area from the top of Ochterlony Monument, Calcutta published in the magazine, The Graphic, in 1875.
A wood engravings by some unidentified European artist.

Panoramic View Of Esplanade Area, Calcutta, 1865

অক্টারলনি মিনার থেকে এসপ্ল্যানেড অঞ্চলের বিসারিত দৃশ্য, ১৮৬৫
Here is a panoramic view of Esplanade area from the top of the Ochterlony Monument focusing on the handsome architecture of the ‘city of palaces‘ as it was called in those days its impressive array of public and private buildings along with Esplanade Row and Chowringhee Road. This photograph is a part of the album ‘Photographs of India & Overland Route’contributed by many other contemporary photographers, including Samuel Bourne.
This was taken by Oscar Jean Baptiste Mallitte in the 1860s

Old Court House Street looking south, Calcutta, 1865

দক্ষিনমুখী ওল্ড কোর্টহাউস স্ট্রীট, কলকাতা, ১৮৬৫

A view of the southern end of Old Court House Street, from the north-east corner of the grounds of Government House, looking towards the Maidan and showing the classical-designed premises of various businesses on the east side of the street.

Photograph was taken by Samuel Bourne in the 1865.

Military Club House across the Dhurrumtollah Tank, Esplanade Row, Calcutta, 1851

clubHouse-Tankধর্মতলা তালাও সংলগ্ন মিলিটারি ক্লাব, এসপ্ল্যানেড রো, কলকাতা, ১৮৫১
This is a view looking across the Dhurrumtollah Tank towards the buildings along Esplanade Row. The Military Club, later United Services Club, and finally the Bengal Club, is the four storied building on the left. When the Bengal Club was first conceived in the winter of 1826-7, it was christened the Calcutta United Service Club, at a meeting held in the Calcutta Town Hall. It was presided over by Lt Col the Hon J. Finch, who was later to become the first President of the Club. The Club was housed in a building in Esplanade West, erected in 1813. Fund raising was through the then popular method of lottery. This large neo-classical building now houses the Geological Survey of India.
A hand-coloured print of the Military Club House, Calcutta, from the Fiebig Collection: Views of Calcutta and Surrounding Districts, taken by Frederick Fiebig in 1851.

Bengal Club House, Esplanade Row, Calcutta, 1833

clubHouseবেঙ্গল ক্লাব, এসপ্ল্যানেড রো, কলকাতা, ১৮৩৩
The Bengal Club was founded at Calcutta in 1827. At the time this image was produced the club was housed in Gordon’s Buildings in the middle of Esplanade Row. It moved to Tank Square around 1830 and subsequently purchased the house in Chowringhee Road formerly occupied by Thomas Babington Macaulay. The Bengal Club is still in existence at this site.
When the Bengal Club was first conceived in the winter of 1826-7, it was christened the Calcutta United Service Club, at a meeting held in the Calcutta Town Hall. It was presided over by Lt Col the Hon J. Finch, who was later to become the first President of the Club. The Club was housed in a building in Esplanade West, erected in 1813. Fund raising was through the then popular method of lottery.
This is a lithograph of William Wood, derives from plate 5 of his album ‘Views of Calcutta’, 1933

Espanade Row Near The Dhurrumtollah Tank, Calcutta, 1851

Snap 2013-10-21 at 14.21.53

ধর্মতলা তালাও সংলগ্ন এসপ্ল্যানেড রো, কলকাতা, ১৮৫১
This is a view of looking across the Dhurrumtollah Tank, or general water supply, towards Ghulam Muhammad’s Mosque (at the junction with Chowringhee Road) and commercial premises along Esplanade Row. The Esplanade was made by clearing away the jungle around Gobindpore, the most southerly settlement of Calcutta, to build New Fort William in 1757. Esplanade Row was the street marking the southernmost part of the city, and was itself the northern limit of the Esplanade. It was home to many impressive public building including the Town Hall and Government House. See
A hand-coloured print  from the Fiebig Collection: Views of Calcutta and Surrounding Districts. Photograph taken by Frederick Fiebig in 1851

Red Road with Fort William over Horizon, Calcutta, 1870

রেড রোড এবং দূরে ফোর্ট উইলিয়মের দৃশ্য, ১৮৭০
Bird’s eye View of the Red Road with few carts and carriages, and the Fort William on the horizon. The Red Road is an extension of this street. Council House Street connects the western part of Dalhousie Square with Esplanade Row.

Photographer unidentified

General’s Tank, Chowringhee Road, c1833

চৌরঙ্গি রোডে বারোয়ারি দিঘী, এবং ম্যাকলে সাহেবের বাড়ি, c১৮৩৩?
The General’s Tank was one of the three large artificial reservoirs in the Chowringhee district of Calcutta. It was just south of the junction with Park Street. This print also shows the house of Thomas Babington Macauley, who was a Law Member of the Supreme Council of India, and worked on the reorganisation of the Indian legal system necessitated by the New India Act of 1834. He lived at number 33, Chowringhee Road, from 1834 to 1838. Thereafter the building became the headquarters of the Bengal Club.

This lithograph derives from plate 16 from ‘Views of Calcutta’ –an album of paintings by William Wood.

Old Court House Street, Calcutta, 1875

graphic1875-OldCourtHouseSt

ওলড কোর্টহাউস স্ট্রীট, কলকাতার দৃশ্য, ১৮৭৫
Old Court House Street connects Esplanade Row (East). It acquired its name from the old court house, that was located where St. John’s Church now stands. The northern part of the stretch is known as Dalhousie Square (East). It was constructed around 1781, when the finishing touches were put to the new Fort William. It is linked with the name of Col. Henry Watson, who brought about many improvements in Calcutta, including the laying out of surrounding Esplanade. The Red Road is an extension of this street. Council House Street connects the western part of Dalhousie Square with Esplanade Row. The view of the St. John’s Church, and Great Eastern Hotel can be seen in the present location. Interestingly, the scene captured here is found an exact match in the photograph ‘Old Court House Street‘ –taken by Francis Frith in 1850s.
Detailed view of the Old Court House Street, Calcutta published in the magazine, The Graphic, in 1875.
A wood engravings by some unidentified European artist.