Panoramic View Of Esplanade Area, Calcutta, 1865

অক্টারলনি মিনার থেকে এসপ্ল্যানেড অঞ্চলের বিসারিত দৃশ্য, ১৮৬৫
Here is a panoramic view of Esplanade area from the top of the Ochterlony Monument focusing on the handsome architecture of the ‘city of palaces‘ as it was called in those days its impressive array of public and private buildings along with Esplanade Row and Chowringhee Road. This photograph is a part of the album ‘Photographs of India & Overland Route’contributed by many other contemporary photographers, including Samuel Bourne.
This was taken by Oscar Jean Baptiste Mallitte in the 1860s

Old Court House Street looking south, Calcutta, 1865

দক্ষিনমুখী ওল্ড কোর্টহাউস স্ট্রীট, কলকাতা, ১৮৬৫

A view of the southern end of Old Court House Street, from the north-east corner of the grounds of Government House, looking towards the Maidan and showing the classical-designed premises of various businesses on the east side of the street.

Photograph was taken by Samuel Bourne in the 1865.

Military Club House across the Dhurrumtollah Tank, Esplanade Row, Calcutta, 1851

clubHouse-Tankধর্মতলা তালাও সংলগ্ন মিলিটারি ক্লাব, এসপ্ল্যানেড রো, কলকাতা, ১৮৫১
This is a view looking across the Dhurrumtollah Tank towards the buildings along Esplanade Row. The Military Club, later United Services Club, and finally the Bengal Club, is the four storied building on the left. When the Bengal Club was first conceived in the winter of 1826-7, it was christened the Calcutta United Service Club, at a meeting held in the Calcutta Town Hall. It was presided over by Lt Col the Hon J. Finch, who was later to become the first President of the Club. The Club was housed in a building in Esplanade West, erected in 1813. Fund raising was through the then popular method of lottery. This large neo-classical building now houses the Geological Survey of India.
A hand-coloured print of the Military Club House, Calcutta, from the Fiebig Collection: Views of Calcutta and Surrounding Districts, taken by Frederick Fiebig in 1851.

Bengal Club House, Esplanade Row, Calcutta, 1833

clubHouseবেঙ্গল ক্লাব, এসপ্ল্যানেড রো, কলকাতা, ১৮৩৩
The Bengal Club was founded at Calcutta in 1827. At the time this image was produced the club was housed in Gordon’s Buildings in the middle of Esplanade Row. It moved to Tank Square around 1830 and subsequently purchased the house in Chowringhee Road formerly occupied by Thomas Babington Macaulay. The Bengal Club is still in existence at this site.
When the Bengal Club was first conceived in the winter of 1826-7, it was christened the Calcutta United Service Club, at a meeting held in the Calcutta Town Hall. It was presided over by Lt Col the Hon J. Finch, who was later to become the first President of the Club. The Club was housed in a building in Esplanade West, erected in 1813. Fund raising was through the then popular method of lottery.
This is a lithograph of William Wood, derives from plate 5 of his album ‘Views of Calcutta’, 1933

Espanade Row Near The Dhurrumtollah Tank, Calcutta, 1851

Snap 2013-10-21 at 14.21.53

ধর্মতলা তালাও সংলগ্ন এসপ্ল্যানেড রো, কলকাতা, ১৮৫১
This is a view of looking across the Dhurrumtollah Tank, or general water supply, towards Ghulam Muhammad’s Mosque (at the junction with Chowringhee Road) and commercial premises along Esplanade Row. The Esplanade was made by clearing away the jungle around Gobindpore, the most southerly settlement of Calcutta, to build New Fort William in 1757. Esplanade Row was the street marking the southernmost part of the city, and was itself the northern limit of the Esplanade. It was home to many impressive public building including the Town Hall and Government House. See
A hand-coloured print  from the Fiebig Collection: Views of Calcutta and Surrounding Districts. Photograph taken by Frederick Fiebig in 1851

Chowringhee Theatre, Theatre Road, Lower Chowringhee, 1833

থিয়েটার রোডের অধুনালুপ্ত রঙ্গালয়, ‘চৌরঙ্গি থিয়েটার’, ১৮৩৩
This image shows the imposing theatre on the corner of Theatre Street and Lower Chowringhee Road. The whole site between Chowringee Road and Elysiam Row (Now Lord Sinha Road) was occupied by the Chowringee Theatre. The adjacent house to the north was known as Ballards’ Place. The expenses of the construction and the cost of the materials for the stage were borne by a number of gentlemen subscribing amongst themselves the shares of Rs. 100 each. It was beautifully crowned with a dome. The Chowringhee Theatre (1813 to 1839) was the principal theatrical venue in the city.  Some affluent British theatre-lovers along with a few Bengali elites founded Chowringhee Theatre. Accordingly, this also came to be known as the ‘Subscription Theatre’ Among the illustrious patrons who donated generously for this Theatre, the names of Mr. Hares Heman Wilson, D.L. Richardson, Dwarakanath Thakur etc. deserve mention. It was inaugurated on 25th November, 1813 and the maiden play held here was a remarkable tragedy named ‘Castle Spectre’. Several dramas were performed here in course of time. The actors in the initial days were amateurs. Later, some renowned professional actors joined this troupe breaking away from the big banners. But, the Theatre was staggering due to acute financial stringency. In 1835, Prince Dwarakanath Thakur purchased it and made some drastic renovations. Unfortunately, in 1839, this Theatre was completely incinerated. After that it was never revamped and play acting was never resumed here. – Interestingly, the female roles at the theatre were played by professional actresses but male roles were taken by amateurs, such as William Princep, whose memoirs describe his theatre work in detail, both as actor and set designer, and give us insights into the running of the building.
This lithograph of painting dated 1833 is taken from plate 22 from ‘Views of Calcutta’ an album of paintings by William Wood.

Muhurram Procession, Calcutta, c1912

Muharam-withTaziaকলকাতার রাস্তায় মহরম মিছিল, তাজিয়া, c১৯১২

This is a view of Muhurram procession through a crowded Calcutta street with tazieh theatre performance in the background. Tazieh drama re-enacts heroic tales of love and sacrifice. Muharram is the first of the four sacred months of the Islamic lunar calendar. It is held to be the most sacred of all the months, excluding Ramadan. The tenth day of Muharram is the Day of Ashura. The event marks the anniversary of the Battle of Karbala by arranging ‘majalis’ (gatherings) to commemorate Imam Hussain’s sacrifice. One form of mourning is the theatrical re-enactment of the Battle of Karbala. In Iran this is called taziya or taziyeh. Theatrical groups that specialize in taziya are called taziya groups. In Calcutta, the two Muslim ceremonies, Eid ul-Fitr, and Muharram are being observed with pomp and grandeur through centuries.
The photograph may have been taken in 1912 by some unidentified British civil servant in Calcutta

Old Court House Street, Calcutta, 1875

graphic1875-OldCourtHouseSt

ওলড কোর্টহাউস স্ট্রীট, কলকাতার দৃশ্য, ১৮৭৫
Old Court House Street connects Esplanade Row (East). It acquired its name from the old court house, that was located where St. John’s Church now stands. The northern part of the stretch is known as Dalhousie Square (East). It was constructed around 1781, when the finishing touches were put to the new Fort William. It is linked with the name of Col. Henry Watson, who brought about many improvements in Calcutta, including the laying out of surrounding Esplanade. The Red Road is an extension of this street. Council House Street connects the western part of Dalhousie Square with Esplanade Row. The view of the St. John’s Church, and Great Eastern Hotel can be seen in the present location. Interestingly, the scene captured here is found an exact match in the photograph ‘Old Court House Street‘ –taken by Francis Frith in 1850s.
Detailed view of the Old Court House Street, Calcutta published in the magazine, The Graphic, in 1875.
A wood engravings by some unidentified European artist.

Military Parade on the Esplanade, c1858

এসপ্ল্যানেড চত্তরে ফৌজি কুচকাওয়াজ, c১৮৫৫?
A military parade on the Esplanade on the occasion of Proclamation of the Queen’s rule in India, Calcutta 1st November, 1858
a mid 19th Century watercolour by Thomas Allom